Southern Lapwing

Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis)
Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis)
Southern Lapwing

Order : Charadriiformes
This is a diverse order which includes about 350 species of birds in all parts of the world. Most Chardriiformes are strong flyers, some species performing the most extensive migration of any birds. Most live near water and eat invertebrates or other similar small animals and most nest on the ground. the order is split into 3 main suborders; Charadrii (about 200 species including Sandpipers, Plovers and Lapwings ), Lari ( about 92 species including Gulls, Turns, Skimmers and Jaegers), and Alcidae ( about 21 species including Auks, Guillemots and Puffins)

Family : Plover (Charadriidae)
The bird family Charadriidae is made up of about 64 to 66 species and includes the Plovers, Dotterels and Lapwings. They are small to medium sized birds with compact bodies, short thick necks and long usually pointed wings. The have world wide distribution and inhabit open countryside usually near water. They feed mostly on insects, worms and other invertebrates, usually obtained by a run and pause technique rather than probing like some other wader groups.

Name : Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis)
Length : 32 cm ( 13 in )

This strikingly marked and multi coloured bird inhabits low cut grassland and pastures near water. The nest is simply a depression on the ground, the young moving away from the nest soon after hatching. The parents defend the nesting site forcefully diving to with inches of any predator, including humans. It has a loud and distinctive warning that can be heard whenever the Lapwing is disturbed, day or night, and can act as an early warning for other species. The diet consists mainly of insects and other small invertebrates.


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Bird identification images
Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis) Birds of Tobago

Southern Lapwing (Vanellus chilensis) Birds of Trinidad & Toabgo